Alaska Mechanics Lien Guide and FAQs

Fact-checked by the Levelset Legal Team
Last updated June 25, 2020
If contractors and suppliers don’t get paid on a construction project in Alaska, they can file a mechanics lien to secure payment. A mechanics lien is a legal tool that provides the unpaid party with a security interest in the property. This page breaks down the rules, requirements, and deadlines you need to follow to file an Alaska mechanics lien.

I fill out their form, they do what they need to do and I don’t have to worry about it because it’s done.

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When should a mechanics lien be used in the payment process?

Start a job

Preliminary notice
slow
pay?

Escalate payment problem

Notice of intent to lien
no
pay?

Demand payment

Mechanics lien

Alaska lien & notice deadlines for:

Preliminary notice requirements
Before Work


In Alaska, a Notice of Lien Rights may be served on owner & filed before providing labor or materials. This extends lien recording time and transfers the burden of proof to the owner.

Send Your Notice
Mechanics lien deadline
120 Days


Generally, Alaska requires a mechanics lien to be filed within 120 days after actual completion of the contract or last day of furnishing labor or materials.

However, if the property owner files a Notice of Completion, it cuts the lien deadline to 15 days after that Notice. If a claimant files a Notice of Right to Lien with the county recorder at any point during the project and before the 15 day deadline, the filing deadline is reset to 120 days.

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Lien enforcement deadline
6 Months


Under Alaska law, a claimant must act to enforce their mechanics lien within 6 months after the date the Claim of Lien was recorded.

However, Alaska allows a lien to be extended for an additional 6 months if an Extension Notice is recorded in the same recording office as the original lien within the original 6-month period.