Colorado Mechanics Lien Laws: Guide and FAQs

Fact-checked by the Levelset Legal Team
Last updated June 24, 2020
If contractors and suppliers don’t get paid on a construction project in Colorado, they can file a lien to secure payment. A mechanics lien is a legal tool that provides the unpaid party with a security interest in the property. This page breaks down the rules, requirements, and deadlines you need to follow to file a Colorado mechanics lien.

I fill out their form, they do what they need to do and I don’t have to worry about it because it’s done.

Ready to file?

File A Lien Now

When should a mechanics lien be used in the payment process?

Start a job

Preliminary notice
slow
pay?

Escalate payment problem

Notice of intent to lien
no
pay?

Demand payment

Mechanics lien

Colorado lien & notice deadlines for:

Notice requirements
10 Days


Colorado requires all potential lien claimants to serve a Notice of Intent to Lien on the property owner 10 days before filing.






Send Your Notice
Mechanics lien deadline
2 Months


Individual laborers in Colorado must file a lien within 2 months from completion of the project.






File A Lien Fast
Enforcement deadline
6 Months


Claimants must file an action to enforce a mechanics lien in Colorado within 6 months after completion or last furnishing of services or materials.


Notice requirements
10 Days


Colorado requires all potential lien claimants to serve a Notice of Intent to Lien on the property owner 10 days before filing.






Send Your Notice
Mechanics lien deadline
4 Months


General contractors, subcontractors, suppliers, and most others must file a Colorado mechanics lien within 4 months after last providing services or materials.

File A Lien Fast

Enforcement deadline
6 Months


Claimants must file an an action to enforce a mechanics lien in Colorado within 6 months after completion or last furnishing of services or materials.