Utah Notice of Completion FAQs

Ready? File Your Notice of Completion Now

File Your Notice Now
CTA - Utah-Notice of Complition-03

Notice of Completion: Utah

Utah has its own online portal for project owners, designers, contractors, and suppliers to monitor and file their mechanics lien documents. All documents related to a project can be found on the Utah State Contractor’s Registry site. This makes it easy to know who’s working on a project and chooses to file preliminary notices and other lien documents.

A notice of completion is not required in Utah — however, it does reduce the lien filing deadline from 180 days after completion of the original contract to 90 days after the date the notice of completion was filed.

The notice can be filed by the property owner, general contractor, lender, surety, or title company after final inspections have been completed, the certificate of occupancy has been issued, or all work has been completed. The notice is filed through the state contractor’s registry site, where it is uploaded and attached to the job.

The notice of completion form must include the following information:

  • Contact information for the person filing the notice
  • Name of the county where the project is located
  • For private projects:
    • Tax parcel ID number(s)
    • Entry number of preliminary notice
    • Building permit number
  • For public projects:
    • Government project-identifying information
  • Date of final completion
  • Method used to determine final completion

Once filed, notices are distributed electronically to each company that filed a notice of commencement, each company that filed a preliminary notice for the project, and anyone else who has requested notices regarding the project.

In addition to shortening the time to file a mechanics lien, a notice of completion also affects preliminary notice deadlines on both private and public construction projects. Utah preliminary notices to secure lien rights, or rights to make a claim against the payment bond, can be effective even if sent late. However, neither notice may be filed later than 10 days after a notice of completion is filed. 

On certain non-bonded jobs over $500,000, a GC or an owner general contractor can choose to file an intent to complete form. It must be filed at least 45 days before the project is to be completed. The effect of this filing is to require anyone who filed a preliminary notice on the project to file a form called Remaining to Complete within 20 days.

This form discloses how much the company is owed and how much they owe on the project to date. Its purpose is to create further transparency regarding payments owed and owing at each level of the payment tier.

Utah Notice of Completion FAQs

There is a lot of information to digest about notices of completion in Utah, so a Q&A-style breakdown might be the easiest to follow. The following are some of the most frequently asked questions about Utah’s notice of completion rules, requirements, and implications.

How does a notice of completion affect a construction project in Utah?

A notice of completion reduces the lien filing period from 180 days after completion of the original contract to just 90 days from the date the notice of completion was filed — but no later than 180 days after final completion of the original contract.

Completion is defined as final inspection approval, issuing the certificate of occupancy, or all work completed onsite.

A Utah notice of completion can also affect the ability/timing to file a preliminary notice on both private and public projects. Generally, preliminary notices (whether to secure lien rights or the right to make a claim against the payment bond on public projects) can be filed late, but will only protect the value of labor and/or materials provided in the 5 days preceding the notice, and everything thereafter.

However, if a notice of completion is filed on the project, preliminary notices can’t be later than 10 days after the filing of a notice of completion.

Who needs to file a notice of completion in Utah?

A notice of completion can be filed by the property owner, general contractor, lender, surety, or title company.

How do I find out if a notice of completion was filed?

Whenever a notice of completion is filed, an electronic notification is sent out by the registry to any party that filed a notice of commencement, preliminary notice, or any interested party who requested notices concerning the project. 

All records regarding mechanics liens are stored on Utah’s State Contractor’s Registry website. You can view all documents for a project by searching by address or record number.

Dive deeper: How Do You Know If a Notice of Completion Was Filed on a Project?

Is a notice of completion required in Utah?

No, it is not mandatory.

Where is a notice of completion filed in Utah?

A notice of completion is filed electronically through the State Contractor’s Registry website.

What happens if a notice of completion isn’t filed?

If no notice of completion is filed, the deadline for filing a mechanics lien remains 180 days past completion of the project. Completion is defined as final inspection approval, issuing a certificate of occupancy, or all work completed.

Need More Help with Utah's Notice of Completion? We're Here

Ask an expert for free

Check out our payment experts
Construction attorneys: Courtney Stricklen, Christopher Ng, Andrea Goldman, and Peter Ryan

Recent Q&As in our Expert Center about Notices of Completion

Paid a handyman who gave us a verbal estimate, are we still liable? He has threatened to place a lien.

I am a homeowner who hired handyman for a back porch repair. He said his fee was $50 an hour. When I asked for his...

Release of Liability Letter

We have a customer where there was a problem on a her plumbing job. We paid to have the shower redone. she is still sending...

Are we within our rights to lien the property without the preliminary lien or the notice of completion form?

Our company provided construction labor and some construction supplies on a project in bountiful Utah. It was a cost plus agreement. We started the project...

How to file a lien in Utah

Need to file a Utah mechanics lien? File your mechanics lien with Levelset, the lien experts quickly and easily. Or you can follow the 3 steps below to file a lien yourself with Levelset's free information.
File with the Mechanics Lien Experts
We’re the Mechanics Lien experts. With us it’s fast, easy, affordable, and done right!
File Now

Want to Learn More about How Utah Contractors Pay?
General Growth Properties
Rating 5.0
C
Payment Score
72 / 100
View
Shaw Contract Flooring Dba Spectra
Rating 5.0
B
Payment Score
81 / 100
View
Wasatch Tile Setters
Rating 5.0
C
Payment Score
75 / 100
View
Young Electric Sign Company dba YESCO
Rating 5.0
A
Payment Score
85 / 100
View
See other Lists of Contractors and How to Best Work With Them

Free Utah Notice of Completion Forms

Utah Notice of Intent to Lien Form - free from

Utah Notice of Intent to Lien Form

This Notice of Intent to Lien form can be downloaded and used to help speed up payment on a construction project in ut. Even though...

Get Form Now

Utah Notice of Intent Statutes

The provision of the Utah statutes that permit the filing of Notice of Completion can be found under Utah Code §§38-1a-506 & 38-1a-507 and is reproduced below. Updated as of September 2021.

UT Notice of Completion

§ 38-1a-506. Notice of intent to obtain final completion.

(1) An owner, as defined in Section 14-2-1, of a nonresidential construction project that is registered with the registry, or an original contractor of a commercial nonresidential construction project that is registered with the registry under Section 38-1a-501, shall file with the registry a notice of intent to obtain final completion as provided in this section if:

(a) the completion of performance time under the original contract for construction work is greater than 120 days;

(b) the total original construction contract price exceeds $500,000; and

(c) the original contractor or owner has not obtained a payment bond in accordance with Section 14-2-1.

(2) The notice of intent described in Subsection (1) shall be filed at least 45 days before the day on which the owner or original contractor of a commercial nonresidential construction project files or could have filed a notice of completion under Section 38-1a-507.

(3) A person who provides construction work to an owner or original contractor who files a notice of intent in accordance with Subsection (1) shall file an amendment to the person’s preliminary notice previously filed by the person as required in Section 38-1a-501:

(a) that includes:

(i) a good faith estimate of the total amount remaining due to complete the contract, purchase order, or agreement relating to the person’s approved construction work;

(ii) the identification of each original contractor or subcontractor with whom the person has a contract or contracts for providing construction work; and

(iii) a separate statement of all known amounts or categories of work in dispute; and

(b) no later than 20 days after the day on which the owner or contractor files a notice of intent.

(4)

(a) A person described in Subsection (3) may demand a statement of adequate assurance from the owner, contractor, or subcontractor with whom the person has privity of contract no later than 10 days after the day on which the person files a balance statement in accordance with Subsection (3) from an owner, contractor, or subcontractor who is in privity of contract with the person.

(b) A demand for adequate assurance as described in Subsection (4)(a) may include a request for a statement from the owner, contractor, or subcontractor that the owner, contractor, or subcontractor has sufficient funds dedicated and available to pay for all sums due to the person filing for the adequate assurances or that will become due in order to complete a construction project.

(c) A person who demands adequate assurance under Subsection (4)(a) shall deliver copies of the demand to the owner and contractor:

(i) by hand delivery with a responsible party’s acknowledgment of receipt;

(ii) by certified mail with a return receipt; or

(iii) as provided under Rule 4, Utah Rules of Civil Procedure.

(5)

(a) A person described in Subsection (3) may bring a legal action against a party with whom the person is in privity of contract, including a request for injunctive or declaratory relief, to determine the adequacy of the funds of the owner, contractor, or subcontractor with whom the demanding person contracted if, after the person demands adequate assurance in accordance with the requirements of this section:

(i) the owner, contractor, or subcontractor fails to provide adequate assurance that the owner, contractor, or subcontractor has sufficient available funds, or access to financing or other sufficient available funds, to pay for the completion of the demanding person’s approved work on the construction project; or

(ii) the parties disagree, in good faith, as to whether there are adequate funds, or access to financing or other sufficient available funds, to pay for the completion of the demanding person’s approved work on the construction project.

(b) If a court finds that an owner, contractor, or subcontractor has failed to provide adequate assurance in accordance with Subsection (4)(a), the court may require the owner, contractor, or subcontractor to post adequate security with the court sufficient to assure timely payment of the remaining contract balance for the approved work of the person seeking adequate assurance, including:

(i) cash;

(ii) a bond;

(iii) an irrevocable letter of credit;

(iv) property;

(v) financing; or

(vi) another form of security approved by the court.

(6)

(a) A person is subject to the civil penalty described in Subsection (6)(b), if the person files a balance statement described in Subsection (3) that misrepresents the amount due under the contract with the intent to:

(i) charge an owner, contractor, or subcontractor more than the actual amount due; or

(ii) procure any other unfair advantage or benefit on the person’s behalf.

(b) The civil penalty described in Subsection (6)(a) is the greater of:

(i) twice the amount by which the balance statement filed under Subsection (3) exceeds the amount actually remaining due under the contract for completion of construction; and

(ii) the actual damages incurred by the owner, contractor, or subcontractor.

(7) A court shall award reasonable attorney fees to a prevailing party for an action brought under this section.

(8) Failure to comply with the requirements established in this section does not affect any other requirement or right under this chapter.

(9) A person who has not filed a preliminary notice as required under Section 38-1a-501 is not entitled to a right or a remedy provided in this section.

(10) This section does not create a cause of action against a person with whom the demanding party is not in privity of contract.

§ 38-1a-507. Notice of completion.

(1)

(a) Upon final completion of a construction project, a notice of completion may be filed with the registry by:(i)
an owner;

(ii) an original contractor for construction work;

(iii) a lender that has provided financing for the construction project;

(iv) a surety that has provided bonding for the construction project; or

(v) a title company issuing a title insurance policy on the construction project.

(b) A notice of completion shall include:

(i) the name, address, telephone number, and email address of the person filing the notice of completion;

(ii) the name of the county in which the project property is located;

(iii) for a private project:

(A) the tax parcel identification number of each parcel included in the project property;

(B) the entry number of a preliminary notice on the same project that includes the tax parcel identification number of each parcel included in the project property; or

(C) the entry number of the building permit issued for the project;

(iv) for a government project, the government project-identifying information;

(v) the date on which final completion is alleged to have occurred; and

(vi) the method used to determine final completion.

(2) A person filing a notice of completion by alternate means is responsible for verifying and changing any incorrect information in the notice of completion before the expiration of the time period during which the notice is required to be filed.

Helping Hundreds of Utah Contractors Like You