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Home>Levelset Community>Legal Help>I performed multiple plumbing jobs for an owner of a RV/mobile home park in Hutchinson Ks. I spent money out of my own pocket for some materials and used hundreds of dollars worth of my own supplies for the repairs. Making a long story short I used all of my own materials for the repairs for the owner. Have given her numerous receipts for reimbursement and she's not willing to pay for the work or supplies. I have sent her the invoices for each Repair or project. I'm now having to spend extra out of pocket money to replenish my inventory out of my truck. She's not willing to even pay for the materials that she's received the receipts for. She asked me to bring my skid loader for snow removal then an hour later said that it was not necessary to remove the snow. She then turned around and demanded that I have the skid loader return. So I informed her that mileage and time wasted would be charged to the park. I feel that I have no choice but to place a lien on the entire park. I've never had any one refuse to pay for the labor let alone the materials. I have given her itemized invoices for each job that was completed. Now she wants to see exactly where each part was installed? I'm at a loss either way?

I performed multiple plumbing jobs for an owner of a RV/mobile home park in Hutchinson Ks. I spent money out of my own pocket for some materials and used hundreds of dollars worth of my own supplies for the repairs. Making a long story short I used all of my own materials for the repairs for the owner. Have given her numerous receipts for reimbursement and she's not willing to pay for the work or supplies. I have sent her the invoices for each Repair or project. I'm now having to spend extra out of pocket money to replenish my inventory out of my truck. She's not willing to even pay for the materials that she's received the receipts for. She asked me to bring my skid loader for snow removal then an hour later said that it was not necessary to remove the snow. She then turned around and demanded that I have the skid loader return. So I informed her that mileage and time wasted would be charged to the park. I feel that I have no choice but to place a lien on the entire park. I've never had any one refuse to pay for the labor let alone the materials. I have given her itemized invoices for each job that was completed. Now she wants to see exactly where each part was installed? I'm at a loss either way?

KansasMechanics LienRecovery Options

Sorry I explained that in the previous box

1 reply

Apr 1, 2019
I'm really sorry to hear about that - no one should have to jump through hoops in order to recover what they've already earned. First, let's look at some of the requirements in order to file a KS mechanics lien. Then, we'll move onto options for recovering payment, including mechanics liens. In Kansas, when someone performs work and/or supplies materials for the improvement of real property, generally, lien rights will arise for that work as long as it results in the permanent improvement of that property. Further, for those who have contracted directly with the property owner, there aren't any notice requirements that a potential lien claimant must send in order to preserve their right to lien. Still, the deadline to file a Kansas lien will still apply - and a mechanics lien claim must be filed within 4 months from the date that labor or materials were last furnished to the improvement. Now, let's talk recovery. First - mechanics liens may be the most powerful tool for recovery when payment is owed but unpaid for construction work. But, because mechanics liens are such a powerful tool, the mere warning or threat of a lien claim can often work to compel payment. By sending a document like a Notice of Intent to Lien, a potential lien claimant can let their customer know that they're serious about payment, and if they remain unpaid, then a lien claim is coming. You can learn more about that idea here: What is a Notice of Intent to Lien? But, warnings and threats won't always work, so progressing to something more serious like a mechanics lien claim might become necessary. For more information on that process, these resources should be helpful: (1) Kansas Lien & Notice Overview, and (2) How to File a Kansas Mechanics Lien. Finally, in a situation where a property owner might be more amenable to working out a payment dispute in order to avoid a mechanics lien filing, there are always other options for recovery. Some of those options are discussed in this article: Don’t Want to File a Mechanics Lien? Here Are 5 Other Options.
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